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Category Archives: Movie Monsters

Monster Gallery: The Ritual (2017)

Main Article: The Moder

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The Moder

“Maybe it was just a gut instinct,” said David Bruckner, director of The Ritual, “but we always knew — maybe it had something to do with the fact that it’s about masculinity in crisis — it’s sort of this old Norse Viking nightmare that these modern men have wandered into; that the movie should always go for it, in the end. Whatever that means. So we always knew that we wanted to reveal, in one way or another, what it was. There are many movies that I admire that are withholding until the end, and like I said, we just felt that wasn’t this film.”

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Scum of the Universe — Men in Black II, part 2

To convince the neuralyzed Kay that what he is saying is true, Jay shows Kay that most of the workers at the postal office are actually aliens. Dozens of concepts were devised, and ultimately nailed down to four.

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Scum Of The Universe — Men In Black II, part 1

Rick Baker and Cinovation Studio returned to design and give life to the creatures for Men In Black II, accompanied on the visual effects front by Industrial Light & Magic. Like its predecessor, the film posed an ambitious challenge of bringing to the screen a vast array of practical and digital creatures; and yet, Sony Pictures demanded completion of the project in a fraction of the time the same teams had been given to produce the first film.

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Scum Of The Universe — Men In Black II, Serleena

Responsible for the design of Serleena’s various forms throughout Men In Black II were Rick Baker himself and ILM art director David Nakabayashi. “The trick,” recalled Nakabayashi, “was to give Serleena creature continuity, even though it would be seen in many different forms. There had to be visual cues telling the audience that Serleena was one creature.”

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Morlocks

“The dark side of the future world is the world of the Morlocks,” said Simon Wells, director of The Time Machine. Early script drafts for The Time Machine portray the Morlocks underground humanoids with mole-like claws. As the creative process progressed, they became more brutish and ape-like. To bring the creatures to life, Wells hired Stan Winston Studio under the supervision of Greg Figiel.

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Hunter — Predator 2

From a tropical jungle to one moulded in concrete, the new hunter in Predator 2 chooses Los Angeles as its hunting ground. “The fantasy I always had was to put the Predator in another kind of jungle,” said writer Jim Thomas. “An urban jungle.” The Thomas brothers returned to craft the story of the sequel. Many of their ideas and concepts for the first film could ultimately not be brought on screen. With Predator 2, the Thomas brothers had the chance to implement them into a new story, with the reassurance that — given a more appropriate budget and production schedule — they could actually be brought to life. “Because of the nature of the first film, we had a lot of detail and backstory about the Predator that we had to leave out,” said Jim, “but we’re including all those missing elements in this one.”

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StarBeast — Alien: Covenant, the Alien

“No one understands the lonely perfection of my dreams. I found perfection here. I’ve created it. A perfect organism.”

“They want Aliens, I’ll give them fucking Aliens,” said Ridley Scott of the eponymous creature’s return in Alien: Covenant. Previously, the director had said that “the beast is done. Cooked,” something that resulted in the complete excision of the Alien from the final script for Prometheus. However, the lack of actual Aliens in the prequel film backfired and became a widespread complaint among enthusiasts of the series; as such, Twentieth Century Fox pushed for the inclusion of the original creature in the sequel. “It went straight up there, and we discovered from it that [the fans] were really frustrated,” Scott said. “They wanted to see more of the original [Alien] and I thought he was definitely cooked, with an orange in his mouth. So I thought: ‘Wow, OK, I’m wrong.'”

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StarBeast — Alien: Covenant, the Neomorph

From the start of Alien: Covenant‘s production, it was known that the monsters in the film would be mostly digital effects. “We knew from the outset that we were going to do fully CG versions of all the creatures,” said visual effects supervisor Charles Henley, “but Ridley also wanted to have something there on set that he could frame on and direct, and that could interact with the actors. We started with the idea of reference puppets; later, this evolved into high-quality creature suits.” Scott said: “sometimes the physicality of an actor doing something odd that you haven’t thought of or you don’t want to do digitally, is useful; so whenever you can, always shoot the monster.”

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Clover

“I wanted a monster movie for so long,” said Cloverfield producer J.J. Abrams during a speech at the 2007 San Diego Comic-Con. “I was in Japan over a year ago with my son, who’s eight; and all he wanted to do was go to toy stores. We went to all these stores and there were still all these Godzillas everywhere. What’s better than Godzilla? And I thought, we need out own monster, like we need a monster movie — not like King Kong. I love King Kong. King Kong is adorable. And Godzilla is a charming monster. We love Godzilla; but I wanted something that was just insane, and intense.”

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